Saturday, January 19, 2008

Jukt Micronics Update

'Perhaps I should create a new image of Stephen Glass specifically for the Plaza of the Mind, something that is half Glass and half Christensen. I feel that this would be a more accurate representation of the Glass that I have come to know and admire.'


About a year ago I made the following statement here at the Plaza:



I sincerely think this guy is one of the greatest Americans alive today.


Here is another comment worth reviewing:

"Jukt Micronics"

Ex Journo Wrote:

Stephen Glass wrote bogus stories for only one reason...to further his own ambitions. He didn't care that he put other people's work and careers at risk, he never thought about what damage he might do with the misinformation he was churning out, it didn't matter to him that he violated the most important relationship in any professional writer's career by repeatedly lying to his editors. He knew he had cleverness and charm and he used those qualities to deceive his friends and colleagues and manipulate them into unwittingly supporting his journalistic fictions.

And, while some people use Glass as a reason for gratuitous media-bashing, don't forget it was another journalist working at another publication who discovered and exposed Glass' lies.

Stephen Glass is no hero. He's just a selfish, dishonest little man who abused his skills and his position, and broke faith with his friends and to this day can't be honest with himself or anyone else about what he did and why he did it.


There's nothing admirable in that.


To which I reply:


My admiration for Mr. Glass lies in his imagination and somewhat in the trouble he got into and how he handled it. There is something profound about that kind of trouble. I have always been fascinated by scandal and have always thought that people jump too quickly into opinions concerning issues that have nothing to do with them at all.

There is a popular bumper sticker that reads 'if you are not outraged, you are not paying attention'. I think a better bumper sticker would read 'if you are not outraged, you probably have a healthy set of boundaries in place.' Impotent outrage helps no one. It does not help the victim of injustice, it does not help the person feeling outraged, it simply raises his or her blood pressure.

I can understand an initial outrage that may perhaps lead to a constructive course of action in which the individual might be able to exert some of his or her own will against the problem at hand. I can understand that sort of useful intervention in the problem.

The reason I think that Mr. Glass is one of the greatest Americans alive lies simply in his creativity and the pained look on his face. There is a subtle beauty in that face. I think that he is a character that really needs to be explored and I suppose I am trying, in my meager way, to keep him in the public imagination.

This admiration, of course, is for the persona of Stephen Glass, as I have never had the pleasure of meeting the man himself. I think that I may have become smitten with Hayden Christensen's portrayal of Glass in the Shattered Glass biographical film and this has colored my perception. Perhaps I should create a new image of Stephen Glass specifically for the Plaza of the Mind, something that is half Glass and half Christensen. I feel that this would be a more accurate representation of the Glass that I have come to know and admire.

As far as media bashing, you won't find any of that at the Plaza of the Mind. People tend to forget that media is not so much something that is created by people as it is something that is lived within by people. There is no point in bashing an environment. One can simply stay away from it if they find if distasteful.

Thanks for participating at the Plaza!



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...[Plaza of the Mind] impressed me in its magnificent weirdness...this sorta je ne sais quoi that you find in interesting art... ...I mean that purely as a compliment!

Stefene Russell

Plaza of the Mind is a clinamen away from the holeopathic replay by the Android Meme of the old perceptual agon of electrically-programmed youth confronting the Gutenbergian Establishment. Irresistible Force meets Immovable Object.

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